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Foro presentará la nueva agenda internacional de género y cambio climático en México

El Programa de Investigación en Cambio Climático (PINCC) de la Universidad Autónoma de México (UNAM), llevará a cabo el foro "Género y Cambio Climático".
 
El objetivo principal del evento es presentar la agenda internacional de género y cambio climático, así como dar a conocer los avances, perspectivas y retos vinculados al sector 
académico, sociedad civil y organismos internacionales en México. Esta actividad está siendo coordinanda en estrecha colaboración con a Oficina Global de Género de la Unión 
Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza (UICN).
 
El evento tendrá lugar el próximo 23 de octubre, a las 13:00 a las 15:15 horas, en el Auditorio Nabor Carrillo de la Coordinación de la Investigación Científica de la UNAM, México D.F. Para más información pueden revisar la agenda en el siguiente link.
 
http://bit.ly/1oduJcv)
 

Meeting of Regional Mangroves for the Future (MFF) Gender Advisory Panel

On August 27, 2014, Mangroves for the Future (MFF) met with IUCN senior managers and representatives from Sida and WOCAN at the IUCN Asia Regional Office in Bankok, Thailand, to discuss the establishment of a Gender Advisory Panel for MFF and IUCN Asia. The Gender Advisory Panel will work towards MFF’s principles of equality, participation, transparency, and accountability.

Following these principles, the panel will act to strengthen gender mainstreaming in MFF’s Phase 3 programme. Ms. Aban marker Kabragi, IUCN Regional Director, noted in her opening remarks that MFF’s mandate for gender integrated planning, implementing, and reporting makes MFF a vehicle for strengthening gender mainstreaming in the region.

Dr. Arzu Rana-Deuba, IUCN Regional Councillor, and Ms. Meher Marker Noshirwani, IUCN CEESP Regional Vice Chair, were elected co-chairs of the Gender Advisory Panel. Although unable to attend the meeting, leading gender practitioners from UN Women, IUCN Global Gender Office, and USAID LEAF confirmed their interest in the MFF Gender Advisory Panel.

The entry points and practical steps for the Gender Advisor Panel discussed include institutional, policy and strategy, capacity building, reports and publications, and monitoring and evaluation. The revised MFF Gender Framework and Action plan will be presented at the Eleventh MFF Regional Steering Committee (RSC-11) on October 25th-28th, 2014.

 

Gender and Renewable Energy Workshop

Gender and Renewable Energy Workshop
By: Rebecca Pearl-Martinez, Senior Gender Officer, IUCN Global Gender Office
 
USAID and IUCN organized a Gender and Renewable Energy Workshop on September 3-5, 2014 in Arlington, VA. The event convened 45 experts on diverse topics under the umbrella of gender, large-scale renewable energy, and climate change mitigation. The workshop was geared toward building new knowledge and guidance on gender considerations in low emissions development planning and the renewable energy sector beyond the household level, with the following objectives:
 
  • ·       Increase awareness and understanding on gender and large-scale renewable energy and low emissions development planning
  • ·       Identify key entry points and opportunities
  • ·       Define future actions at the international, regional, and national levels
  • ·       Identify knowledge and capacity gaps and potential avenues for closing them
 
The impetus for the workshop was the Gender Equality for Climate Change Opportunities (GECCO) initiative, a new 5-year partnership (2013-2017) between USAID’s E3 Bureau and IUCN’s Global Gender Office. The purpose of GECCO is to leverage advancements in women’s empowerment and gender equality through, and for, the benefit of climate change and development outcomes. The initiative has been designed to provide an array of support options for national, regional and global activities that advance women’s empowerment and gender equality. This includes supporting the development of gender responsive climate change action plans and building capacity to implement gender responsive actions in developing countries. 
 
The workshop drew wide participation from the US government, including representatives of USAID, Power Africa, Department of Energy, State Department. It also brought together multilateral institutions, including World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, International Finance Corporation (IFC), UNFCCC, Global Environment Facility (GEF), and utilities experts from Pakistan, Trinidad & Tobago, and Rwanda. The workshop produced action-oriented strategies in the areas of enabling policy, private sector investment, infrastructure for generation, transmission, and distribution, end users, and women’s advancement in employment, leadership, and entrepreneurship. These strategies will be implemented to build momentum at the intersection of gender and clean energy as part of the GECCO initiative.

From Peru to the World: Ensuring a New Climate Change Framework that is Gender Responsive

From Peru to the World: Ensuring a New Climate Change Framework that is Gender Responsive

By: Lorena Aguilar, Global Senior Gender Adviser, IUCN Global Gender Office  

 

I find myself in Peru, one of the oldest civilizations of Latin America. Peru will be the host country, in December of this year, of the twentieth Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP 20).

 

From these shores and mountains , that keep and embrace one of the most megabiodiverse countries in the world, we are examining the links between gender and climate change.

 

In the context of ancient knowledge we are discussing with youth, negotiators, scientists, policy makers and women's groups how to develop an advocacy strategy that will allow COP20 to constitute a milestone to mobilize and strengthen the issue of gender equality.

 

The importance of gender considerations in climate change policy-making, programming and finance has gained significant recognition in recent years—and subsequently, 32 decisions of the UNFCCC have included substantive text on gender that primes Parties for gender-responsive action at national level.

 

The upcoming COP 20, will be an important opportunity to continue to build enabling elements of an effective, efficient, and equitable gender-responsive climate change framework. The Government of Peru, particularly as host of this vital COP, is in a position to take leadership on propelling progress in several areas.

 

Delegates to Peru will thus have the important opportunity to provide a mandate for developing a comprehensive framework including a two-year work program, for implementation of gender provisions.

 

A COP 20 decision can strengthen and substantiate progress on gender-responsive climate policy and implementation.  A time-bound framework for action can ensure that concrete steps are in place to turn words into action, with impact across all key issues and programs of the UNFCCC.

 

Peru the world will be watching you, you have in your hands the possibility of having an impact in the life of million of women around the world.

 

 

Bali is More than Paradise: newest entry of our Gender Senior Advisor´s Blog on gender, climate change and more

 

 

Bali hosts the 2014 Summit on Women and Climate. Lorena Aguilar gives us a scoop of what happened during this meeting. 

For four days, more than 100 people from these two funds have been discussing how to bring together the environmental agenda to the women's rights approach under the topic of gender and climate change. Our role representing IUCN's Global Gender Office has been to share our experience in this matter and guide the discussions.

 

This month my work has brought me to Bali, Indonesia. When I told people that I was coming to this beautiful island, they usually raised an eyebrow and said something along the lines of: "Oh yeah, poor you, going to Bali."
 
But it is true. I am here at a historic moment, a collaboration between two very important funds worldwide: the Global Greengrants Fund and the International Network of Women's Funds.
 
The Global Greengrants Fund is a charitable foundation that makes small grants (typically $500 to $5,000) to grassroots environmental causes around the world. These funds are used to support community-based groups outside the United States and Western Europe working on issues of environmental justice, sustainability, and conservation. Since its establishment in 1993, Global Greengrants Fund has made over 5,000 grants in 129 countries, giving a total of over $20 million.
 
On the other hand, the International Network of Women's Funds (INWF) is a group of women's funds from developing countries in the south and developed countries in the north that are committed to a world of equality and social justice. INWF is part of a global women's movement that, using a gender lens, is redefining the concept and praxis of philanthropy, one in which the most developed countries and the least are working as equals, and one in which the act of giving is not the privilege of just a few but of all.
 
This month my work has brought me to Bali, Indonesia. When I told people that I was coming to this beautiful island, they usually raised an eyebrow and said something along the lines of: "Oh yeah, poor you, going to Bali."
 
But it is true. I am here at a historic moment, a collaboration between two very important funds worldwide: the Global Greengrants Fund and the International Network of Women's Funds.
 
The Global Greengrants Fund is a charitable foundation that makes small grants (typically $500 to $5,000) to grassroots environmental causes around the world. These funds are used to support community-based groups outside the United States and Western Europe working on issues of environmental justice, sustainability, and conservation. Since its establishment in 1993, Global Greengrants Fund has made over 5,000 grants in 129 countries, giving a total of over $20 million.
 
On the other hand, the International Network of Women's Funds (INWF) is a group of women's funds from developing countries in the south and developed countries in the north that are committed to a world of equality and social justice. INWF is part of a global women's movement that, using a gender lens, is redefining the concept and praxis of philanthropy, one in which the most developed countries and the least are working as equals, and one in which the act of giving is not the privilege of just a few but of all.
 
Their commitment to the climate change agenda is very refreshing. When we leave Bali, if there is a green light to move forward, this will change the lives of thousands of women and men in developing countries.
 
The setting where this historic gathering is taking place has also been a catalyst. We found ourselves in the Green School Bali which was awarded the 2012 "Greenest School on Earth."
 

 

The school's buildings are built primarily from renewable resources including bamboo, local grass, and traditional mud walls. The primarily bamboo construction of the campus has been reported as an example of large-scale building potential of bamboo architecture. "The Heart of the School," a 60 meter long stilt-structure constructed with 2500 bamboo poles, has been the site of this important event. The school also utilizes renewable building materials for some of its other needs, and "everything -- even the desks -- are made of bamboo."
 

This blog entry is also available in the Huffingtonpost